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Spiritual Growth

Public·42 Kingdom Warriors
Arthur Semyonov
Arthur Semyonov

Subtitle Sleepers Fixed


Often sleepers are for a limited audience. Last year Mysterious Skin was an example of a movie that deserved as much support as it could get. One certainly couldn't recommend it for everyone -- it is a raw movie about the effects of child abuse -- in fact, one probably issues a warning with such a film.




subtitle sleepers



At the moment in theaters is this year's sleeper. It is a French film, with subtitles. That in itself will deny at least half the audience who should see it. The subtitles are irrelvant -- "merde" should not bog an audience down. And French movies at least have some emphasis on character, which is to the good. The reason why audiences should enjoy and like this film is that in this welter of action films, it may well be the action film of the year.


As you can see from the trailer above, the six-part series is a high-end drama set in 1980s Prague, and the hope is that given the increased willingness of U.S. viewers to read subtitles, and the need for content in the lockdown, it can find an audience outside of Europe. It launched on HBO Europe at the end of 2019, marking the 30th anniversary of the Velvet Revolution.


The House and Senate bills competing to become the National Defense Authorization Act for FY2012 contain a subtitle addressing issues related to detainees at the U.S. Naval Station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and more broadly, hostilities against Al Qaeda and other entities. At the heart of both bills' detainee provisions appears to be an effort to confirm or, as some observers view it, expand the detention authority that Congress implicitly granted the President via the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF, P.L. 107-40) in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.


Both House and Senate bills competing to become the National Defense Authorization Act for FY2012 contain a subtitle addressing issues related to detainees at the U.S. Naval Station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba ("Guantanamo"), and more broadly, hostilities against Al Qaeda and other entities. H.R. 1540, which passed the House of Representatives May 26, 2011, addresses "counterterrorism" matters in subtitle D of Title X. A companion bill in the Senate, S. 1253, was reported out of the Armed Services Committee June 22, 2011, and addresses "detainee matters" in subtitle D of Title X. A second companion bill, S. 1867, was reported out of the Armed Services Committee on November 15, 2011, in an effort to resolve disputes over the detainee provisions that had kept S. 1253 from reaching the floor. On December 1, 2011, the Senate passed S. 1867, as amended. The Senate subsequently passed H.R. 1540, with the Senate bill's provisions inserted in place of the original language. Differences between the House- and Senate-passed versions of the bill will be considered in conference.


Section 1031 provides that, for purposes of subtitle D, the term "individual detained at Guantanamo" refers to any individual detained at Guantanamo on or after March 7, 2011, who is not a citizen of the United States or a member of the U.S. Armed Forces and is "in the custody or under the effective control of the Department of Defense." The provision does not expressly limit the term to those detained under the authority of the AUMF, presumably to ensure that the term covers detainees held at Guantanamo who, despite having been found by a federal court or administrative board not to be enemy belligerents who may be detained pursuant to the AUMF, remain at Guantanamo until such time as their transfer or release to a foreign country may be effectuated. It is unclear who might fall under the "effective control" of the Department of Defense (DOD) yet not be in its custody for purposes of the bill. That term may be intended to cover situations other than immediate physical custody, as might occur if a detainee held at Guantanamo is technically placed in the custody of another agency while remaining under DOD supervision.


The Senate bill S. 1867 covers "Detainee Matters" in subtitle D of Title X. The provisions are similar to the detainee provisions in S. 1253, as reported out of the Armed Services Committee in June, but some language was revised to address Administration concerns. S. 1867 was passed by the Senate, as amended, on December 1, 2011. A single amendment was made to the detainee provisions of the bill as had been reported out of committee, which clarified that the bill's affirmation of the legal authority to detain persons captured in the conflict with Al Qaeda did not modify any existing authorities relating to the power to detain U.S. citizens or lawful resident aliens, or any other persons captured or arrested in the United States. The Senate subsequently passed H.R. 1540, with its original provisions stripped and replaced with the language of Senate-passed S. 1867.


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